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Assignment #1 Foundational VR Experiences


This assignment is due before class on Thursday, January 5.

 

Each student gets 30 minutes of Rift or HTC Vive time playing at least 10 different games/experiences.

post other ones you like to Slack and I'll add them here...

 

After each student has his time on the Rift or HTC Vive, post a short critique of each experience (3-5 sentences for each game played) to the blog. Did the game use the Rift or Vive well? Why or why not? What could they have done better? Provide links and screenshots or videos of what you played so your critiques have context.

 

Pitch #1 Game ideas for Project #1 on Vive or Rift

 

We have 1 HTC Vive and 2 Rift DK2s. For the first project 2 teams will share the HTC Vive and 4 teams will share the Rift DK2s. In order to allocate the Vive and Rift to the most appropriate teams each team will pitch an idea for the platform they want to work on. The HTC Vive uses room-scale VR (player can walk around) as well as hand input using the controllers. The Rift DK2 is generally worn sitting or standing still and will not use hand input. Thus, there are two totally different versions of the first project, one is designed for the Vive and the other is designed for the Rift.

 

Please note that the two ideas a team pitches could both be for the Vive or both for Rift, or one for each.

 

  • Each student brainstorms 10 ideas for either version of Project #1 (scroll down this page)
  • Each student posts their brainstorm on the blog. Include
    • Name of each idea
    • 2-4 sentence description
    • 2-4 sentences describing how the idea meets the project requirements
  • Each student picks their best two ideas and pitches them to their team
  • Each team then picks their top 2 ideas to pitch in class on Thursday

Project #1 RIFT VERSION (If your team has a Rift then do this version)

 

HIGH CONCEPT is NON-HUMAN VR Toy:

Develop a VR toy that allows players to feel what it is like to be very non-human. The player must be given a new, strange, and fantastic body. Make at least part of the body visible to the player. Players must be given some sort of functional control over their new body. The environment must also be a strange and fantastic place. The player's strange new body must impact or change things in the environment in some critical and cool way - this is the hook of the entire experience so make this causality relationship something really striking and special. Concentrate on making it a very fun and unusual toy rather than a structured game.

 

Some things to consider visually... shadows in the environment are important. Paint them in if you have to because they aid in depth perception as well as spatial immersion. Use your foreground, middleground, and background space to really use spatial depth.

 

PREVIOUS EXAMPLES FROM CLASS:

TECHNICAL CONSTRAINTS:

Use only head rotation as input. If you absolutely must add another input, you can also use the Spacebar, but that is it. The experience should last 45-60 seconds. The game must shut down.

 

  • Each team meets in person Thursday evening or Friday afternoon.
  • Develop a Slack communication group. Set a schedule and development plan for the game.
  • If the team didn't have an amazing and totally fleshed out idea on on Thursday January 5th, then:
    • Each student brainstorms again pitches her top two NEW ideas to her team.
    • The team discusses each idea and picks the most promising one. Use these criteria to determine which idea is best :
      1. how well does it use rotation as the main input? the more core the better.
      2. how non-human is it? the stranger the better.
      3. how easy will it be to prototype? the quicker the better.
      4. how fun will it be? the easier to play the better.
    • Revise the idea a few times if necessary.
  • Each team posts their best idea to the blog, explaining in a paragraph how it satisfies each of the four criteria really well.

Part 2: Due Before Class on Tuesday, January 10:

  • Each team prototypes their best idea.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    1. name of toy
    2. at least 2 screen captures showing action
    3. video capture
    4. teammate names and roles INCLUDING list of each major thing they did for prototype
    5. instructions on how to play
    6. download link to prototype
    7. a mid-mortem of what is going well and why, and what is not going well and why. Explain what your team will change to ensure that the game delivers on the high concept and goal of the project.

Part 3: Due Before Class on Thursday, January 12:

  • Each team puts 4 NEW playtesters through their game.
  • Each playtester needs to complete a survey after they play. Ask questions about their first impressions, what was most compelling, most frustrating, etc.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    • the name of the toy and a current screenshot
    • playtest results and proposed changes to address problems that came to light

Part 4: Due Before Class on Tuesday, January 17:

  • Each team makes a dozen major iterations to their toy.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    1. name of toy
    2. teammate names and roles INCLUDING list of each major thing they did for project
    3. instructions on how to play
    4. video capture
    5. at least 2 screen captures showing action
    6. download link to prototype
    7. a postmortem of what went right and wrong and why

 

Project #1 VIVE VERSION (If your team has a Vive then do this version)

 

HIGH CONCEPT: DO WHAT OTHERS ARE TOO TIMID TO IMAGINE

The major breakthrough to consumer VR this generation is the seamless, robust introduction of hand input and room-based VR that encourage players to freely move around albeit in a limited space. This first project is about magically connecting hand, body, and space.

 

From Dr. Strange to the vaudeville magician, the wave of the hand has been the dominant trope of how a character exerts magical will in over a century of entertainment. Now today's players have that power. Magic is increasingly real. Our games are increasingly realistic and immersive, but they are not yet nearly as magicial, shamanistic, or visionary as they will ultimately become. The player should no longer be a lowly brutal god who shoots, bludgens, aims, and kills. The player should be a god of much higher rank whose very reality is challenged by your, the developer's, imagination.

 

The design constraints and goals for this project:

  1. Hand input must cause strange things to occur to the space itself or to things within the space. This cannot be to throw or shoot projectiles, those have been done to death. The hand can twist, come close to face, come close together (there is a controller in each hand remember) etc. Fantastic Contraption does something interesting where you place your hand behind your back to instantiate an object. Don't do rip that off, it's been done already.
  2. The player must have a compelling reason to move around the several feet around them. Do not make it to dodge or peek, those have been done to death. For example Unseen Diplomacy has the Vive player crawl through a vent, which is compelling the first time you do it. Again, Don't rip that off, it's been done already.
  3. The idea must be of very small scope and acheivable in 1.5 weeks.

Concentrate on making this project a very fun and unusual toy rather than a structured game. The more creative your use of the player's hand input and of the space around the player the better.

 

  • Each team meets in person Thursday evening or Friday afternoon.
  • Develop a Slack communication group. Set a schedule and development plan for the game.
  • If the team didn't have an amazing and totally fleshed out idea on on Thursday January 5th, then:
    • Each student pitches her top two best NEW ideas to her team.
    • The team discusses each idea and picks the most promising one. Use these criteria to determine which idea is best :
      1. how well does it use rotation as the main input? the more core the better.
      2. how non-human is it? the stranger the better.
      3. how easy will it be to prototype? the quicker the better.
      4. how fun will it be? the easier to play the better.
    • Revise the idea a few times if necessary.
  • Each team posts their best idea to the blog, explaining in a paragraph how it satisfies the project criteria really well.

Part 2: Due Before Class on Tuesday, January 10:

  • Each team prototypes their best idea.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    1. name of toy
    2. at least 2 screen captures showing action
    3. video capture
    4. teammate names and roles INCLUDING list of each major thing they did for prototype
    5. instructions on how to play
    6. download link to prototype
    7. a mid-mortem of what is going well and why, and what is not going well and why. Explain what your team will change to ensure that the game delivers on the high concept and goal of the project.

Part 3: Due Before Class on Thursday, January 12:

  • Each team puts 4 NEW playtesters through their game.
  • Each playtester needs to complete a survey after they play. Ask questions about their first impressions, what was most compelling, most frustrating, etc.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    • the name of the toy and a current screenshot
    • playtest results and proposed changes to address problems that came to light

Part 4: Due Before Class on Tuesday, January 17:

  • Each team makes a dozen major iterations to their toy.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    1. name of toy
    2. teammate names and roles INCLUDING list of each major thing they did for project
    3. instructions on how to play
    4. video capture
    5. at least 2 screen captures showing action
    6. download link to prototype
    7. a postmortem of what went right and wrong and why

Assignment #2 Prep for Project #2


This assignment has three parts. All are due before class on Tuesday, January 24.

 

1) MORE RIFT and VIVE TIME

Each student gets 30 additional minutes of Rift or Vive time to play at least 5 different games or experiences.

2) NOVEL GAMES: EXPERIENTIAL RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS

Each student should research a few games that try to enable players to experience an altered state or very unusual and subjective experience. Play at least two of them. Post a short critique of each experience (3-5 sentences for each game played) to the blog. What could they have done better to achieve a stronger or more provocative experience? Provide links and screenshots or videos of what you played so your critiques have context.

 

3) LIFE: EXPERIENTIAL RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS
Seek a novel and dramatic experience that YOU have never had before. This could be anything from bungee jumping to attending a Pentecostal church or a rave party. Do whatever is the most new and strange for you do to. Post several paragraphs to the blog objectively describing what you did and what your subjective experience was like. Consider how that experience could be used and exaggerated as inspiration for a new kind of game experience.

 

Project #2 Strong Altered State VR Toy

HIGH CONCEPT:

Develop a VR toy that enables players to attain a strong altered state that is novel to games. Concentrate on making an experiential toy rather than a structured game.

 

ALTERED STATES:

Your experience can be dark and terrible or light-hearted and goofy as long as it allows players to experience a strong, altered state novel to games. Most importantly, do NOT make a game ABOUT something, make a game that delivers a unique EXPERIENCE. Powerful art can enable people to enter altered states, for example, Serra and Holt's Boomerang. Profoundly religious experiences can cause participants to enter altered states, e.g. speaking in tongues or seeing the holy spirit fly through a congregation. Night terrors are another example, e.g. when a paralyzed child feels a demon or hag crushing her chest stealing her breath. Ayahuasca ceremonies pull folks into altered states, e.g. they learn their spirit power songs and vomit dark energy sludge. The state could be even more specific than these. You can be inspired by an unusual event you've experienced but change and exaggerate its sensations. For example, when I lived in Taiwan I was walking home with a headache at 5am and saw what appeared to be a working bike on a pile of garbage. I touched the seat and a hand lurched from the trash, grabbing my wrist. A large, screeching female figure rose from the trash. For a few seconds my mind reeled and I entered an altered state, it seemed like the trash monster from Fraggle Rock was about to envelop me. If you represented what I just described, that would not be very strong or unique to games. You would have to push and exaggerate each detail until it got 100 times better.

 

NOVEL

The experience should be new and novel for all games not just new for VR. No other game should deliver anything like it. Soundself was inspired by LSD experiences and Burning Man, there are games that try to convey crippling depression, being drunk, etc., so do your research to make sure you are delivering an experience that is completely novel to games.

 

STRONG

The game should come on like Gang Busters. That means that from the first second of the experience, players are plunged into something intense. Use both SOUND and VISUALS to accomplish this. The experience needs to be very strong. It should suck players right in and hold them tight, twisting their awareness like a snake charmer, hurricane, or siren song.

 

CRITERIA TO SUCCEED:

  1. Use head rotation as the main input and mechanic. The more core rotation is to changing or affecting the experience the better. You can also use controller, keyboard, or microphone input if absolutely necessary, but only if it dramatically helps deliver the other criteria below. Consider that putting the player on rails or using the spacebar to teleport may be a better option than allowing players free movement.
  2. Achieve a strong and novel altered state. The rarer and more intense the better.
  3. Pick an idea that is easy to prototype. The quicker the better.
  4. Pick an idea that is toylike and encourages experimentation. The more playful and reactive to input the better. Toylike does not require your experience to be positive or light-hearted. Terrifying or dark situations could still be toylike and reactive to players (e.g. a demon could terrorize the player as it mimics her movement or head rotation).
  5. The experience must end at 30 seconds. The game should shut down. This will help playtesting and evens the playing field.
  • Each student brainstorms 10 toy ideas for the project. Name each toy idea. Describe each one in 2-4 sentences. Pick the two ideas you think are the most promising. Use these criteria to determine which two ideas are best :
    1. how well does it use rotation as the main input? the more core the better.
    2. how strong and novel is the altered state? the rarer and more intense the better.
    3. how easy will it be to prototype? the quicker the better.
    4. how fun will it be? the more toylike and experiment-encouraging the better.
  • Explain how your top two ideas satisfy each of those four requirements. Write a paragraph for each.
  • Each team meets in person Thursday evening or Friday afternoon.
  • Each student pitches her top two ideas to her team.
  • The team discusses each idea and picks the most promising one. Use these criteria to determine which idea is best :
    1. how well does it use rotation as the main input? the more core the better.
    2. how strong and novel is the altered state? the rarer and more intense the better. Do your research. Are there any other games like it?
    3. how easy will it be to prototype? the quicker the better.
    4. how fun will it be? the more toylike and experiment-encouraging the better.
  • Revise the idea a few times if necessary.
  • Each team posts their best idea to the blog, explaining in a paragraph how it satisfies each of the four criteria really well.

Part 3: Due Before Class on Tuesday, January 24:

  • Each team prototypes their best idea.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    1. name of toy
    2. at least 2 screen captures showing action
    3. video capture
    4. teammate names and roles INCLUDING list of each major thing they did for prototype
    5. instructions on how to play
    6. download link to prototype
    7. a mid-mortem of what is going well and why, and what is not going well and why. Explain what your team will change to ensure that the game delivers on the high concept and goal of the project.

Part 4: Due Before Class on Thursday, January 26:

  • Each team puts 4 NEW playtesters through their game.
  • Each playtester needs to complete a survey after they play. Ask questions about their first impressions, what was most compelling, most frustrating, etc.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    • the name of the toy and a current screenshot
    • playtest results and proposed changes to address problems that came to light

Part 5: Due Before Class on Tuesday, January 31:

  • Each team makes a dozen major iterations to their toy.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    1. name of toy
    2. teammate names and roles INCLUDING list of each major thing they did for project
    3. instructions on how to play
    4. video capture
    5. at least 2 screen captures showing action
    6. download link to prototype
    7. a postmortem of what went right and wrong and why

Assignment #3 Prep for Project #3


Items due before class on Thursday, February 2

 

1) READ this article: Working for the Man. First, just try to understand the author's complete argument before you start picking it apart. Now, what would you add to or critique about his argument?

 

2) BROWSE playground artist Richard Dattner's work (one of his works appear in the opening of Sesame Street) as well as M. Paul Friedberg's work. And browse this blog on playgrounds. If in those three links you do not find any playground designs that you consider awesome and exemplary, search the internet for playgrounds that you do think are awesome. What are some traits or rules to what you consider to be excellent playground design? Does good playground design address or solve any of the problems raised in the first article? Why or why not?

 

3) READ this article: 6 Keys for Playground Design. What points from this article translate well into VIRTUAL playground design and what points do not? Consider the first article as well when you answer this next question: if you had to offer 6 Keys for VIRTUAL playground design for ADULTS using a Rift, what would they be?

 

4) POST to the blog your answers to the questions in items 1-3 listed above. Write at least a paragraph for each of three items.

 

Assignment #4 More Rift Time and Play Outside

 

Items due before class on Tuesday, February 7:

 

1) MORE RIFT and VIVE TIME

Each student gets 30 additional minutes of Rift and Vive time to play at least 5 different games or experiences. Post a short critique of each game to the blog.

 

2) PLAY OUTSIDE

Do something you rarely or have never done outside. I don't care what it is but do for 20 minutes. Maybe climb on some rooftops, do cartwheels through a park, or crawl through a playground. Take a picture and post it and what you did to the blog.

 

Project #3 VR Playgrounds

HIGH CONCEPT:

Develop a fun, weird, and dynamic playground. Be Bold. Failure is an option. ADVANCE THE MEDIUM OF VR. What makes an incredible VR Playground? Perhaps the equipment is a kind of 3D "interface" that dynamically changes and reacts to the player. Maybe the player is reborn in a kind of VR Pure Land designed by Paul Klee and Noguchi but programmed and puppeteered by H.P. Lovecraft and Jim Henson.

 

COLLABORATE TOGETHER TO FAIL FAST

Programmers, artists, designers should collectively devise strategies to achieve a super polished FEELING and LOOKING playground. Do not waste time on anything that does not pay off within AN HOUR of prototyping and testing. Remember to "shoot the baby in the crib" and cut losses early. Keep failing fast until you come up with something incredible.

 

FLEX THE POSSIBILITY SPACE

Check out the playgrounds blog one more time. Imagine what those designers would unleash in VR. VR space, mechanics, and physics are only limited by your imagination, knowledge of the engine/tools, and problem-solving skills. Don't be conservative with the playground layout (i.e. don't just place crap around a flat plane). Be creative with how you approach, see, and think about space as Ender does in Ender's Game. Remember the player's neck: it is uncomfortable to look up or down for too long, or to look behind you too often.

 

STRONG ART STYLE

Bake shadows and craft unique and compelling lighting and architectures. Think outside the box to give your playground a cool finished, memorable vision. For example, instead of using blob shadows, you could put blob lights on the floor beneath bright or self-illuminated objects (you would do this in addition to putting an actual light in the object itself), that layered effect could look very sleek. Brainstorm dozens of tricks like that to make your playground look and feel fantastic.

 

STRONG COLOR PALETTE

To ensure your playground looks STUNNING you need to come up with a strong color palette. If you do not have a better idea for a color palette structure, use an Analogic & Complementary scheme (explore options on left. float mouse around screen to get different effects. horizontal position determines hue, vertical position determines shade/tint).

 

CONSIDER ABSTRACTION

Consider an abstract visual style because it will be easier to polish. Abstraction is a common strategy for game developers who want to achieve a high level of polish with very limited resources (see Mirror Moon, Race the Sun). You are not required to use an abstract style, however.

 

CONSIDER RIFFING OF AN ABSTRACT ARTIST

You may want to browse some abstract artists and focus on one whose art strongly moves you. The harder to explain why you like the artist's work, the better. Check out any abstract artist, e.g. Al Held (really fitting for this project), Paul Feeley, Sam Francis, or pick a Geometric Abstract Sculptor or Playground Fine Artist Toshiko Horiuchi-MacAdam. Check out these radiolaria.

 

CRITERIA TO SUCCEED

This project will take a different strategy in determining the criteria for success. Each team will determine their own 6 keys to excellent VR playground design. Take your own 6 keys seriously. Deliver on each one to invent and define an exemplary "VR Playground." Each team's playground will be assessed using their own 6 keys in addition to these 2 criteria:

  1. Design your playground so it is easy to prototype. The quicker to test the better.
  2. Your playground must advance the medium of VR. No more passive spectacles to just fly, sit, or glide through or gawk at. Before Tuesday I was not going to add this criterion because I did not think you needed it. I was disappointed to see several teams take this intellectually lazy route in the last project. That is a waste of our time. Lead don't follow.
  • Each student brainstorms 10 ideas for the playground. Name each idea. Describe each one in 2-4 sentences. Pick the two ideas you think are the most promising. Use the 6 keys you posted to the blog in Assignment #3 in addition to the two criteria I list above to determine which of your two ideas are best.
  • Explain why your top two ideas satisfy each of your 6 keys and my 2 additional criteria. Write a paragraph for each idea.
  • Each team meets in person Thursday or Friday.
  • Each team discusses what they think comprise the 6 Keys to excellent VR Playground design. Agree on the language for each key and post them to the blog.
  • Each student pitches her top two ideas to her team.
  • The team discusses each idea and picks the most promising one. Use the 6 Keys that they had agreed upon previously plus the 2 additional project criteria to determine which idea is best.
  • Revise the idea a few times if necessary.
  • Each team posts their best idea to the blog, explaining in a paragraph how it satisfies each of the 6 Keys and 2 additional project criteria extremely well.

Part 3: Due Before Class on Tuesday, February 7:

  • Each team prototypes their best idea.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    1. name of playground
    2. at least 2 screen captures showing action
    3. video capture
    4. teammate names and roles INCLUDING list of each major thing they did for prototype
    5. instructions on how to play
    6. download link to prototype
    7. a mid-mortem of what is going well and why, and what is not going well and why. Explain what your team will change to ensure that the game delivers on the high concept and goals of the project.

Part 4: Due Before Class on Thursday, February 9:

  • Each team puts 4 NEW playtesters through their playground.
  • Each playtester needs to complete a survey after they play. Ask questions about their first impressions, what was most compelling, most frustrating, etc.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    • the name of the playground and a current screenshot
    • playtest results and proposed changes to address problems that came to light

Part 5: Due Before Class on Tuesday, February 14:

  • Each team makes a dozen major iterations to their playground.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    1. name of playground
    2. teammate names and roles INCLUDING list of each major thing they did for project
    3. instructions on how to play
    4. video capture
    5. at least 2 screen captures showing action
    6. download link to prototype
    7. a postmortem of what went right and wrong and why

Assignment #5 Rift Time and Time Traveling

 

Items due before class on Tuesday, February 21:

 

1) MORE RIFT TIME

This may be the last opportunity you have in a long time to play with VR on your own time. USE IT WELL. Search out the coolest, weirdest VR experiences to play. Each student gets 30 additional minutes of Rift time to play at least 5 different games or experiences. Post a short critique of each game to the blog.

 

2) WHAT INSPIRES YOUR YOUNGER/OLDER SELVES?

Read the entire Project #4 description. What are some themes, ideas, dreams, nightmares, etc., that would entertain and inspire your 10-15 year-old self AND your 30-40 year-old self? How do they inspire both versions of yourself? Post a few paragraphs to the blog.

 

Project #4 Final Project

HIGH CONCEPT:

Develop a game that:

  • Would inspire and entertain your 30-40 year-old self. As you develop your game, imagine what a more experienced and worldly version of yourself would enjoy. In part, this is a psychological trick. For example, if you are nervous before you need to give a talk, if you imagine that the audience is your close friends who are eager to see you, and who you are eager to see, you will give a much more gripping, high-quality talk. For this project imagine the kind of person you will become once you have 10-20 more years of experience playing and making all kinds of games. Most VR games are broken, shallow, or for idiots. What would impress and entertain a more advanced version of yourself who has seen it all?
  • Would inspire and entertain your 10-15 year-old self. What dreams and crazy fantasies would you have loved to play in a VR experience when you were a kid? Imagine your young self putting on a Rift and launching your game. What would blow their minds the most?
  • Is inspired by at least one reference. The reference can be an artist, visual phenomenon, song, landmark, insect, etc. Find an artist or thing who really moves you and use them as a reference pool to get ideas for art, audio, interaction, and/or experience design. This is a personal choice, so you should seek out artists based on your own interests and tastes. For example, I like to browse these resources to find new artists:

CRITERIA TO SUCCEED

  1. Your game inspires your future and past selves. Because it is impossible to assess and critique this criterion we will have to trust you each did your very best.
  2. Use your inspirational reference in an integral way either visually, acoustically, or experientially.
  3. Design your game so it is easy to prototype. The quicker to test the better.
  4. Your game must advance the medium of VR. No more passive spectacles to just fly, sit, or glide through or gawk at. Use the affordances the medium in a creative and substantial way.
  5. Players inexperienced with VR must be able to fully enjoy your game.
  • Each student selects their inspirational reference. Brainstorms 10 ideas for the game. Name each idea. Describe each one in 2-4 sentences and post to blog.
  • Each student picks the two ideas they think is the most promising. Use the criteria I list above to determine which of your two ideas are best. Explain why your top two ideas satisfy the project criteria and how your inspirational reference will influence the game. Write a paragraph for each idea. Include a link to your inspirational reference (or embed images).
  • Each team meets in person Thursday or Friday.
  • Each student shares their inspirational reference and pitches her top two ideas to her team.
  • The team discusses each game idea and picks the most promising one. Use the project criteria to determine which idea is best.
  • Revise the idea a few times if necessary.
  • Each team posts their best idea to the blog, explaining in a paragraph how it satisfies the project criteria extremely well. Provide a link to the inspirational reference (or embed images in post).

Part 3: Due Before Class on Tuesday, February 21:

  • Each team prototypes their best idea.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    1. name of game
    2. sentence describing inspirational reference as well as link (or embed images in post).
    3. at least 2 screen captures showing action
    4. video capture
    5. teammate names and roles INCLUDING list of each major thing they did for prototype
    6. instructions on how to play
    7. download link to prototype
    8. a mid-mortem of what is going well and why, and what is not going well and why. Explain what your team will change to ensure that the game delivers on the high concept and goals of the project.

Part 4: Due Before Class on Thursday, February 23:

  • Each team puts 4 NEW playtesters through their game.
  • Each playtester needs to complete a survey after they play. Ask questions about their first impressions, what was most compelling, most frustrating, etc.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    • the name of the game and a current screenshot
    • playtest results and proposed changes to address problems that came to light

Part 5: Due Before Class on Tuesday, February 28:

  • Each team makes a dozen major iterations to their game.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    1. name of game
    2. sentence describing inspirational reference as well as link (or embed images in post).
    3. teammate names and roles INCLUDING list of each major thing they did for project
    4. instructions on how to play
    5. video capture
    6. at least 2 screen captures showing action
    7. download link to prototype
    8. a mid-mortem of what has gone well and poorly and why

Part 6: Due Before Class on Tuesday, March 7:

  • Each team makes another dozen major iterations to their game.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    1. name of game
    2. sentence describing inspirational reference as well as link (or embed images in post).
    3. teammate names and roles INCLUDING list of each major thing they did for project
    4. instructions on how to play
    5. video capture
    6. at least 2 screen captures showing action
    7. download link to prototype
    8. a postmortem of what has gone well and poorly and why

Part 7: Due Before FINAL EXAM on Tuesday, March 14:

  • Each team makes another dozen FINAL major iterations to their game.
  • Each team posts to the blog:
    1. name of game
    2. sentence describing inspirational reference as well as link (or embed images in post).
    3. teammate names and roles INCLUDING list of each major thing they did for project
    4. instructions on how to play
    5. video capture
    6. at least 2 screen captures showing action
    7. download link to prototype
    8. a postmortem of what has gone well and poorly and why

 

 

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